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Male & Female Belgian Sheepdog Weights & Heights by Age

Written by: Z

Z

Z is a Special Project Coordinator of HomeLife Media and a writer for iHeartDogs.com. She has 3 dogs namely Skye, Luna, and one of them is a rescue, named Tesla.Read more
| Published on April 9, 2024

The Belgian Sheepdog, renowned for its elegance and intelligence, typically stands between 22 to 26 inches (56 to 66 cm) at the shoulder for males, and slightly less for females. In terms of weight, males typically range between 65 to 75 pounds (29 to 34 kg), while females generally weigh slightly less, between 55 to 65 pounds (25 to 29 kg). These majestic dogs boast a well-proportioned physique, with a sleek, muscular build beneath their thick, black coat. With their impressive stature and graceful demeanor, Belgian Sheepdogs embody both strength and agility, making them cherished companions and skilled working dogs alike.

Male Belgian Sheepdog Weights & Heights by Age

The following chart contains the average weights and heights of male Belgian Sheepdog from newborn to 3 years of age. Please note these are only averages. Always consult with your veterinarian if you have any concerns about your Belgian Sheepdog’s growth.

Age (Months/Years) Height (inches/cm) Weight (pounds/kg)
0 8-10 (20-25) 5-10 (2.3-4.5)
1 11-14 (28-36) 10-20 (4.5-9)
2 15-18 (38-46) 20-30 (9-13.5)
3 18-21 (46-53) 30-40 (13.5-18)
6 months 21-24 (53-61) 45-55 (20.5-25)
1 22-25 (56-63.5) 50-60 (22.5-27)
2 22-26 (56-66) 55-65 (25-29.5)
3 22-26 (56-66) 55-75 (25-34)

Female Belgian Sheepdog Weights & Heights by Age

The following chart contains the average weights and heights of female Belgian Sheepdog from newborn to 3 years of age. Please note these are only averages. Always consult with your veterinarian if you have any concerns about your Belgian Sheepdog’s growth.

Age (Months/Years) Height (inches/cm) Weight (pounds/kg)
0 8-10 (20-25) 5-10 (2.3-4.5)
1 11-14 (28-36) 10-20 (4.5-9)
2 15-18 (38-46) 20-30 (9-13.5)
3 18-21 (46-53) 30-40 (13.5-18)
6 months 21-24 (53-61) 45-55 (20.5-25)
1 22-25 (56-63.5) 50-60 (22.5-27)
2 22-26 (56-66) 55-65 (25-29.5)
3 22-26 (56-66) 55-75 (25-34)

These tables are based on general guidelines and can vary greatly depending on individual dogs. Always consult with a veterinarian or professional breeder for more specific information about your pet’s growth and development.

FAQs about a Belgian Sheepdog Puppy’s Growth and Development

1. How fast will my Belgian Sheepdog puppy grow?

Belgian Sheepdog puppies typically experience rapid growth during their first year, with the most significant growth occurring in the first six months. Growth rates vary between individuals, but most puppies will reach their full height by around 12 months of age.

2. When should I switch my Belgian Sheepdog puppy to adult dog food?

Transitioning your Belgian Sheepdog puppy to adult dog food should occur gradually, typically around 12 to 18 months of age, depending on the specific nutritional needs and growth rate of your puppy. Consult with your veterinarian to determine the best timing and diet plan for your puppy’s transition.

3. How much exercise does my Belgian Sheepdog puppy need?

Belgian Sheepdog puppies are energetic and require regular exercise to support their physical and mental well-being. Aim for short, frequent walks and play sessions to prevent overexertion, especially during the rapid growth phase, which can strain developing joints.

4. Is my Belgian Sheepdog puppy’s weight within the healthy range?

Monitor your Belgian Sheepdog puppy’s weight regularly and consult breed-specific growth charts to ensure they are within the healthy weight range for their age and size. Avoid overfeeding, as excess weight can strain growing bones and joints and lead to health problems later in life.

5. How often should I take my Belgian Sheepdog puppy to the veterinarian?

Regular veterinary check-ups are essential for monitoring your Belgian Sheepdog puppy’s growth and development. Schedule visits every few weeks during the first few months, then transition to regular check-ups every 6-12 months, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

6. When should I start training my Belgian Sheepdog puppy?

Early socialization and training are crucial for Belgian Sheepdog puppies to develop into well-behaved adult dogs. Start basic obedience training and socialization exercises as soon as you bring your puppy home, focusing on positive reinforcement techniques to build a strong bond and promote good behavior.

7. How can I ensure my Belgian Sheepdog puppy’s bones and joints develop properly?

Provide a balanced diet rich in essential nutrients, including calcium and phosphorus, to support healthy bone and joint development in your Belgian Sheepdog puppy. Avoid excessive exercise, especially high-impact activities like jumping or running on hard surfaces, to prevent injuries during the growth phase.

8. What vaccinations does my Belgian Sheepdog puppy need?

Follow your veterinarian’s vaccination schedule to ensure your Belgian Sheepdog puppy receives essential vaccinations to protect against common canine diseases. Core vaccinations typically include distemper, parvovirus, adenovirus, and rabies, while non-core vaccinations may be recommended based on your puppy’s lifestyle and risk factors.

9. How can I help my Belgian Sheepdog puppy adjust to their new home?

Create a safe and comfortable environment for your Belgian Sheepdog puppy, with a designated sleeping area, plenty of toys for mental stimulation, and a consistent routine to establish security and reduce stress. Gradually introduce your puppy to new experiences, people, and other animals to promote socialization and confidence.

10. What grooming routine should I follow for my Belgian Sheepdog puppy?

Regular grooming is essential to keep your Belgian Sheepdog puppy’s coat healthy and free from tangles and mats. Brush your puppy’s coat weekly, paying extra attention to areas prone to matting, such as behind the ears and under the legs. Bathe your puppy as needed, using a mild dog shampoo recommended by your veterinarian.

11. When will my Belgian Sheepdog puppy’s ears stand up?

Belgian Sheepdog puppies typically have floppy ears that gradually begin to stand up as they grow. Ear carriage varies between individuals, but most puppies will have fully erect ears by around 4-6 months of age. If your puppy’s ears do not stand up by this age, consult with your veterinarian for further evaluation.

12. How can I prevent my Belgian Sheepdog puppy from chewing on everything?

Provide plenty of appropriate chew toys and outlets for your Belgian Sheepdog puppy to satisfy their natural urge to chew. Supervise your puppy closely and redirect chewing behavior to acceptable toys whenever necessary. Consistent training and positive reinforcement will help teach your puppy appropriate chewing habits.

13. When should I spay or neuter my Belgian Sheepdog puppy?

Consult with your veterinarian to determine the best timing for spaying or neutering your Belgian Sheepdog puppy, taking into account factors such as age, health status, and individual breed recommendations. Early spaying or neutering may be recommended to prevent unwanted behaviors and health issues, but it’s essential to weigh the potential risks and benefits.

14. How can I prevent my Belgian Sheepdog puppy from developing separation anxiety?

Gradually acclimate your Belgian Sheepdog puppy to being alone by practicing short separations and gradually increasing the duration over time. Provide plenty of mental stimulation and interactive toys to keep your puppy occupied while you’re away, and avoid making departures and arrivals overly dramatic to minimize anxiety.

15. What signs of illness should I watch for in my Belgian Sheepdog puppy?

Monitor your Belgian Sheepdog puppy for any changes in behavior, appetite, or energy level, as these can be early indicators of illness. Watch for symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, coughing, sneezing, lethargy, or unusual discharge from the eyes or nose, and consult with your veterinarian if you have any concerns.

16. How can I socialize my Belgian Sheepdog puppy with other dogs?

Expose your Belgian Sheepdog puppy to a variety of friendly dogs of different sizes, ages, and breeds in controlled environments, such as puppy classes or supervised playgroups. Encourage positive interactions and monitor your puppy’s body language for signs of fear or discomfort, intervening if necessary to prevent conflicts and ensure a positive socialization experience.

17. What type of collar or harness is best for my Belgian Sheepdog puppy?

Choose a collar or harness that fits your Belgian Sheepdog puppy comfortably and securely without causing any discomfort or restriction. Opt for a lightweight, adjustable collar or harness with a sturdy leash attachment point, and avoid using choke or prong collars, which can cause injury or discomfort.

18. How can I teach my Belgian Sheepdog puppy to walk on a leash?

Start leash training your Belgian Sheepdog puppy gradually, using positive reinforcement techniques to encourage walking calmly beside you. Begin in a quiet, familiar environment, and gradually introduce distractions as your puppy becomes more comfortable on the leash. Reward your puppy for walking nicely on the leash and avoid pulling or yanking on the leash, as this can cause fear or resistance.

19. What should I do if my Belgian Sheepdog puppy is not eating?

Monitor your Belgian Sheepdog puppy’s appetite and behavior closely, as changes in eating habits can indicate underlying health issues or stress. Offer your puppy a variety of high-quality, palatable food options, and consult with your veterinarian if your puppy continues to refuse food or shows signs of illness, such as vomiting or diarrhea.

20. How can I help my Belgian Sheepdog puppy overcome fear or anxiety?

Provide a safe and supportive environment for your Belgian Sheepdog puppy, with plenty of positive reinforcement, patience, and encouragement to build confidence and trust. Gradually expose your puppy to new experiences and environments, using desensitization and counter-conditioning techniques to help them overcome fears and anxieties gradually. If your puppy’s fear or anxiety persists, seek guidance from a professional dog trainer or behaviorist for specialized assistance.

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